Who you calling nigga?

Definitions of nigga on the Web:

  • nigger: (ethnic slur) extremely offensive name for a Black person; “only a Black can call another Black a nigga”
    wordnet.princeton.edu/perl/webwn
  • The word “nigger” is a highly controversial term used in many English-speaking countries, including the United States, Canada, Britain, and Australia to refer to individuals with dark skin, especially those of African descent who previously were racially classified by the now outdated term Negro. It was once the standard, casual English term for black people. …

Why did I post those?

Well a friend of mine, he is on my list, prompted me to respond to a blog entry about how they felt about the word, its place and who has ‘mainstreamed’ its use. I realized that I couldn’t respond in some short comment and decided to write a blog about it myself.

Back to the use of the word.  Well I have issues with several of the words we use to describe ourselves.  Here are the ones I chose to talk about.

Nigger. Well it never was a nice word,  people would try to fool you. Sure it is true, words over time, can change meanings. But it isn’t something that will happen in this lifetime. I remember recently hearing that word on mainstream TV who wasn’t black and was instantly incensed. Thought about how I use the word and how others of my hue do as well… I was ashamed. I slipped into the trap. You see, if we get used to hearing it then it must be ok right. No. It isn’t right and I will do my best not to use that word.

African American. I told you I was southern right? Let me tell you what else I am. I am a quarter Cherokee on BOTH sides of my family, not sure what that fraction makes  and  Irish on my mother’s side.  I am generally offended by this label because it forces me to back away from the history that makes me American. The trials  and troubles of a great, great, great, grandmother who married Irish to stay off the trail of tears and in Georgia. Of a great, great, grandmother and all the mothers of my line after who clung to the strong, dark chocolate arms of their husbands and fathers of their children. I don’t use that term, it is too limiting.

Black. When I was growing up my mother told me why she liked the term and I think it is why I still use it to describe myself racially. She told me of a time when to be paper sack brown or lighter, to be a member of the blue vein society was coveted. That Negro and Nigger was basicly the same thing and that it was time for us as a people to embrace and accept the depth and breath of that color. That black was the color of  blue eyed, honey  pale skinned, straight hair as it was the color of the darkest skin tone, eye color, and the kinkiest hair. That it was time to absorb and exude the truth. Black is beautiful. To be black is to be proud and strong and reseliant.

Mocha. I use that term to describe the hue and tone of my skin. I used to just be coffee colored, too many summers in Florida as a child and young adult. I think of my shade as the richness that you would find in a Starbucks cup if you would just pop the lid. Two sugars, two creams and a liberal sprinkling of chocolate.  I also use it to describe myself, warm, sweet and oh so creamy. But if you aren’t careful it will and I will burn you. Don’t treat it lightly because it is sweet.

That is how I feel about it. I could be wrong. But I doubt it.

Mocha.Image

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